Recognition

Discovery Girls offers wisdom on what really matters, strategies for navigating relationship challenges, and ideas on how to bounce back from embarrassments and disappointments...

Ken Ginsburg, MD, MS Ed

 

What people are saying about Discovery Girls

I am a mom whose daughter really enjoys your magazine and I am thrilled that at age 13, she is still anxiously paging through the newest copy when it arrives in the mail! We have had a subscription for a few years now and I have been very happy with the way the girls are presented on the covers and throughout the magazine (very natural-looking and not a lot of makeup) and the articles are very appropriate for preteen and early teen girls. I like that there aren’t a lot of articles or covers full of guys and makeup stories. It is a refreshing change of pace from our fast-paced world and I just wanted to say "Thank you for the great magazine--keep up the good work!"
My daughter fell in love with it immediately, and I’m so glad to find out more about how Discovery Girls originated. I am always glad to find a magazine that isn’t about celebrities, and that addresses real issues and shows pictures of real girls. Building self-esteem is so important. My daughters are 9 and 12 and we’re going to get subscriptions for both of them.

Megan Weir

I am so pleased to see a magazine targeted for tweens that is actually written for tweens. I try to keep my own twelve year old girls away from most other tween magazines because they are written to appeal to girls’ desire to be teenagers. As a result, they offer hypersexualized views that focus on boys, appearance, and “stars.” They tell you how to look, what to wear, how to think, and even sometimes how to feel. I fear they do harm. Discovery Girls is different. It is age-appropriate and filled with wisdom on why each girl should be comfortable with herself. It acknowledges the unique challenges of these years and gives advice from tweens to tweens. It offers wisdom on what really matters, strategies for navigating relationship challenges, and ideas on how to bounce back from embarrassments and disappointments. My favorite article talked about the value of failure, even repeated failure, on the road toward self-confidence and success. This is such a vital message in an era where kids are pushed so hard and pulled in so many directions that many young girls feel less than acceptable. When girls feel less than acceptable they may develop a fear of failure, withdraw from challenges or become perfectionists. I am thrilled that you seem committed to letting girls be girls (rather than pushing them to be women) and to building their resilience. I feel really comfortable leaving Discovery Girls around my house for my girls to “find.” Please don’t change your approach, it is needed.

Ken Ginsburg, MD, MS Ed

Author of A Parent’s Guide to Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Your Child Roots and Wings. Published by The American Academy of Pediatrics in 2006.